Super Smash Bros Ultimate Sells Over 12 Million Units, Fastest Selling Nintendo Home Console Game Ever

Nintendo has officially released sales numbers for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, and the results are staggering. Currently, the ‘ultimate’ iteration of the storied arena fighter has sold 12.08 million units, resulting in the title becoming the fastest selling Nintendo home console game in the company’s history.

In a flurry of announcements pertaining to the company’s fiscal results of its previous quarter, it is important to note that these results end on December 30st, 2018, meaning the game achieved this feat in a matter of 23 days.

Previously, the title of fastest selling Nintendo home console game was held by New Super Mario Bros. for Wii, selling 10.55 million. In comparison, the Wii iteration of New Super Mario Bros. hit that sales statistic between its November 11th, 2009 release date and December 30th, 2009; over a month and a half sales period.

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate released on December 7th, 2018 to critical and consumer acclaim. Nintendo announced plans for multiple DLC packs coming to the game through February 2020, in the form of the Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Fighters Pass. The pass in total will include five new fighter, five new stage, and additional music tracks, with packs of one fighter, one stage, and chunks of music tracks releases throughout the scheduled time frame. Each pack will be individually sold as well, outside of the Fighters Pass. With a stead flow of additional content on the horizon, things only look positive in terms of sales for Nintendo’s newest Super Smash Bros. entry.

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Blizzard Announces New Overwatch Map, Paris

Blizzard Entertainment has announced that their hit hero shooter Overwatch will be receiving a new map soon that is set in Paris, France, and it is currently live on the game’s Public Test Region for PC players.

Announced through the game’s newest set of patch notes along with a tweet from Overwatch‘s official Twitter account, the new map themed around the famous European city is an Assault map, which pits teams against each other by capturing and defending a pair of points throughout the map. ‘Begin your journey at the Cabaret Luna, where the velvety alto voice of preeminent diva Luna charms movie stars, revolutionaries, locals, and tourists alike” described Tom Powers, Community Manage of Overwatch within the patch notes. “After the encore, step outside to see the sights and seize victory. Artisanal shops line the streets as you approach the first point, so duck in to sample a macaron or escape enemy fire. Battle through alleys and corridors before clashing with your foes on the banks of the Seine. Once you establish dominance over your adversaries, make your way to Maison Marat and deliver the coup-de-grâce.”

Paris will be the first map to hit Overwatch since the addition of Busan in September 2018, along with the first Assault map since June 2017’s Horizon Lunar Colony.

While Blizzard has not released a specific date on which the map will go live from PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One players, normally the test period lasts a few weeks before integrating them into the game’s main map rotation. It wouldn’t be shocking to see the map go live by the end of February (if not earlier).

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Mario Kart Tour Delayed Until Summer 2019

Announced exactly one year ago today, Nintendo’s upcoming mobile iteration of its best selling kart racer, Mario Kart Tour, has been delayed to this upcoming summer.

The announcement comes from the release of Nintendo’s latest fiscal quarterly highlights, which shine a light on many aspects of the Japanese gaming giant’s business aspects. The decision to push the game from its initial from early 2019 release date was made ‘in order to improve the quality of the application and expand the content of the service after delivery’.

Originally announced to release during Nintendo’s past fiscal year (April 2018-March 2019), Mario Kart Tour plans to bring Nintendo’s iconic cast of characters from the Mario franchise to your smartphone device in all of their wacky and fast-paced kart racing glory. As of now, Mario Kart Tour is planning to release on iOS, Android, and the Google Play Store.

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Option To Turn off Xbox One/PC Cross Play Coming to Sea of Thieves

In a weekly Developer Update video released on the game’s official YouTube account, Executive Producer of Sea of Thieves Joe Neate announced that an option to turn off cross play between Xbox One and PC players was coming to the game.


While touching on a number of topics surrounding the game and its community, Neate stated that listening to the feedback from players, especially concerning the new Arena on the horizon, and that their focus as a developer was to make sure everyone was given a level playing field. “We’ve been discussing this in length internally and we’ve arrived at a solution that we are starting working on implementation.” Neate reiterates that this option will not be coming right away, but players should be made aware that measures are being taken into effect in the near future.

Sea of Thieves is one of many Xbox One first party titles that is receiving mouse and keyboard support on the console version of the game, which has since caused a bit of worry in certain sects of the game’s player base. Given the game’s first person perspective, many players believe that given the mouse and keyboard option will provide a competitive advantage heading into the new PvP mode that is due out within the next few months. Providing more detailed matchmaking and cross play options to the upcoming mode would help balance the competitive nature of it.

The Arena, which was announced at Microsoft’s XO18 event in Mexico City last November, is a free content update that is slated to release in the first half of 2019.

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The Accidental Attraction of Kingdom Hearts

When you tell most stories surrounding an attraction, usually they contain many of the similar tropes; one of which is the unexpectedness of the feeling. When I look back on many of my fondest gaming memories, I can see why I fell in love with those specific games. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was the first time I experienced a deep narrative experience in gaming, Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End is the first time I truly felt that the gaming medium had matched the presentation level of big budget cinema coupled with great gameplay, and the Halo series was the first time I was truly able to attach fierce competitiveness in gaming. Yet, there’s one series that somehow sticks out, that even after all these years, I can’t truly put my finger on why it has stayed so endearing to me: Kingdom Hearts.

Maybe it’s because my early years of gaming rooted me into Nintendo’s ecosystem of games. When I first received my Nintendo 64 at the age of 5 in 1998, Final Fantasy had started to become a relic of years past on Nintendo’s hardware. With the success of Final Fantasy VII (and VIII to follow in the upcoming year), the Sony PlayStation had all but cemented itself as the new home of the series, and while I did go onto own multiple PlayStation systems, the series always appeared to me as a grittier and grown up version of what The Legend of Zelda had to offer (see, the marketing campaigns for the PlayStation did work on feeble minds like mine). Seeing that cover of Final Fantasy VII, with Cloud Strife standing heroically showing off his large Buster Sword to fans, made me think “Woah, this guy is cool. I want to play as him”. Yet, I never had the chance to play Final Fantasy VII until years later, due largely because of the Teen rating (yes, my parents were those kind of parents up until I was about 10), so when the next generation of gaming rolled around, I HAD to make sure I got a PlayStation 2. “I can’t miss out on Final Fantasy” I remember thinking constantly (clearly oblivious to the fact that the series was multi-platform due to me being an unknowing 8 or 9 year old kid). Final Fantasy was always the series that was the untouchable for me. Everything I saw about it attracted me to it, but it was always on the system I didn’t have growing up or it was rated too mature for my age. That was, until I saw the trailer for Kingdom Hearts.

Remember how popular Disney Stores used to be? In the late 1990s and early 2000s, it seemed as though they were in a staple in every mall across America. Clear as day, I remember going into our local mall with my mother and sister, who was around the age of three at the time, so the Disney Store was always a given stop when we’d venture to the mall. Remembering they had sections of Disney-based games, I hurried to the back where the wall of TVs were found to scope out the selection (if it had something to do with gaming, I’d always be up for it). While digging through the piles of Donald Duck: Goin’ Quackers and Extremely Goofy Skateboarding, something caught my eye; it was Cloud Strife on one of the TVs on the store display. ‘What’s he doing in the Disney Store? This must be a mixup’ I thought. Then, I saw Goofy and Donald in the background, in what looked to be a level surrounding Hercules. Eyes glued to the glass screen, I began to get lost in this complex idea of meshing the vibe and characters of Final Fantasy with so many beloved characters of my childhood from Disney. To be honest, I’m still not sure if I truly understood what I was watching. So many thoughts went through my head. Confusion? Sure. Unique? Definitely. Interested? Absolutely. Kingdom Hearts flashed across the screen. Instantly, the name was ingrained in my brain, and I began plotting on how to get the game. Christmas was too far off, so I did every chore under the sun that a 9 year old kid could think off. Doing the dishes, cleaning the house, taking the dog for a walk around the block, helping my dad cut some fire wood; anything to help stuff my piggy bank with my weekly $5 allowance. After weeks of saving (and a lucky price drop), I strolled into EB Games (yes, they were still a things in the US in 2002), and picked up the game. I’ll never forget that holographic cover. The way the shades of deep blue made the florescent heart shaped moon pop on the cover was unfathomable at the time. It still holds a special place in my heart in terms of video game covers. Popping that disc in my PS2’s disc tray for the first time was quite magical. From the first time I stepped onto Destiny Islands, I was hooked. Back when memory cards were still a thing, I remember needing to leave my PS2 running because I didn’t have one yet to save my game. This resulted in one long weekend of getting little outdoor exercise, and playing through the adventure without turning my system off over the span of three days. Surprisingly, my PS2 is still working to this day.

Maybe it was the idea of including such a known property in Disney to Final Fantasy‘s fantastical world that attracted me. Disney has never been one to shy away from the gaming industry, releasing video games with various characters of theirs dating back to 1981; yet, the company has always remained quite guarded when allowing outside entities handle their own intellectual property. With the success of the Kingdom Hearts series being so well known, it seems hard to imagine that the now storied chance meeting between series creator and Square Enix employee Tetsuya Nomura and a Disney executive in their shared office complex elevator was a major key (get it?) to making this series a reality, but it was quite different during the sixth console generation. While other developers had handled Disney IP in the past, Kingdom Hearts was the first time I truly remembered seeing Disney characters sharing the stage with other entities in gaming.

Maybe it was the way the series grew with me, as it moved into its sequels. Square Enix and Disney Interactive’s first entry in the collaborative series was very much designed to be warm and welcome, using its art direction and simplistic (comparative to later entries, that is) storyline to target a younger demographic. While I loved my time with the original entry, I saw myself leaning towards a new experiences in gaming. Halo and Xbox Live became a pillar in time spent gaming, and my Xbox began to take more precedence over my PlayStation 2. Yet, when Kingdom Hearts II was first revealed at E3 2004 I found myself intrinsically drawn back into the zany yet loving mashup. Retrospectively looking at the footage shown in 2004, much more of the game’s JRPG innards were on display, showing a much more engaging, deep, and even mature narrative this time around. Death was real. The idea of actuality was real. Themes that took a deep approach to the once simplistic storyline were largely present in the sequel; much of which I found myself attracted to as I began to grow. As the series began to transpire and grow, so did I. Sure, as the series has continued to produce side entry after side entry the more convoluted the narrative became, but it balanced the perfect balance of tropes its original entry was known for and the integrated JRPG elements.

Maybe I’ll never know exactly what draws me to Kingdom Hearts. Hell, I still find it hard to believe that Kingdom Hearts III is actually releasing today. Since the credits rolled on the second mainline entry in 2006, many fans have been waiting patiently to see the conclusion of this storyline in the overarching Kingdom Hearts universe, including myself. Since we’re delving into the past, it’s fascinating to see how often this series has been attached to larger moments in my life, to an extent. Getting through those awkward preteen years, to junior high heartbreaks, to playing through the original entries leading into my college graduation, to my fiancée preordering the game as a gift for me when I graduated from grad school in 2016; somehow this unique, and quite frankly odd, offshoot of a gaming series has somehow remained close to me. Life is a funny thing.

Cheers to everyone who, like this author, have waited almost 13 years to see the release of Kingdom Hearts III. Hopefully, the wait is worth it to you.

It’s weird how some of the best memories and moments happen accidentally.

Capcom Announces Release Date For Resident Evil 2 Free Update ‘The Ghost Stories’, February 15th

Capcom has finally confirmed a release date for The Ghost Survivors, a free content update for Resident Evil 2, coming on February 15th, 2019.

Announced last week, the free content update delves deeper into the fateful events that took place in Raccoon City during Resident Evil 2, centering around three characters that don’t receive a brighter spotlight within the game’s narrative: the gunshop owner, the mayor’s daughter, and the solider. The titles of the specific scenarios have been released as well: No Time to Mourn, Runaway, and Forgotten Soldier.

The remake to the original survival horror classic released last Friday, January 25th, to massive critical acclaim, and it appears to also be finding commercial success as well. Eurogamer is reporting the re-imagining of the classic title has topped the UK sales charts for the last week, and is the best selling Resident Evil entry since Resident Evil 7 in 2017 (though RE2‘s sales are currently 18% less than that of RE7 during the same time frame). US sales numbers have yet to be released, but we will provide an update when they are.

Resident Evil 2 is available now on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.

UPDATE 1/28/19 12:25 PM EST: Capcom has also announced that two character skins resembling the 1998 aesthetic of the original for Leon and Claire will be coming to Resident Evil 2 for free on February 15th, 2019.

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Breaking: Nintendo Confirms Restart on Metroid Prime 4 Development, Bringing On Retro Studios

In a shocking turn of events, Nintendo has confirmed that development on the highly anticipated Metroid Prime 4 will be restarted, with the series’s original creator Retro Studios being brought in to help with the process.

In a video released on Nintendo’s YouTube page, Shinya Takahashi, Senior Managing Executive Officer, released the statement regarding the status of the newest entry in the beloved Sci-Fi series. “We deeply understand the high anticipation that Metroid Prime series fans have for this title” Takahashi began. “Ever since the announcement, we have not been able to give you an update but as a result of the continuing development since that time – although this is very regrettable – we must let you know that the current development progress has not reached the standards we seek in a sequel to the Metroid Prime series. We have determined that the current development status of the game is very challenged, and we had to make a difficult decision as a development team. We have decided to re-examine the development structure itself and change it. Specifically, we decided to have the Producer, Kensuke Tanabe, to work in trust and collaboration with the studio that developed the original Metroid Prime series, Retro Studios in the United States, and restart development from the beginning.”

For decades, the Japanese gaming giant has been known for its development philosophy that iconic company figure Shigeru Miyamoto made famous, that “a delayed game is eventually good, and a bad game is bad forever”; which Takahashi touches on in the statement. “Nintendo always strives for the highest quality in our games; and in the development phase, we challenge ourselves and confront whether the game is living up to that quality on a daily basis. If we’re not satisfied with the quality, we aren’t able to deliver it to our customers with confidence, and the game will not live up to our fans’ expectations. From this perspective, we have determined that the current development status of the game is very challenged, and we had to make a difficult decision as a development team.”

Takahashi emphasizes that it will be quite some time before fans see the product in full, with development restarting, but expresses confidence that the wait will be worth it, as the company hopes to bring fans of the long running series an entry that fans will hold in high regard.

Metroid Prime 4 was originally announced at Nintendo’s E3 2017 Spotlight Direct, with no additional information provided at the time or since then regarding the development of the game, including a release date or even an attached development team. Rumors began circulating after E3 2018 that the company had planned to reveal the game later that year at the Game Awards 2018 for a release the following year, along with a Metroid Prime Trilogy collection for the Switch, but neither were heard of or seen at the event in December.

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